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Racial justice: Where you can donate and other actions you can take

Last month, George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died while Officer Derek Chauvin, a white Minneapolis police officer, knelt on his neck while detaining him.

Floyd’s death sparked national outrage and grief that has received global attention. Days of protests against police brutality have followed in large cities and smaller towns across the country and the world.

Floyd is one of the more than 1,000 people killed by police officers every year. Of that number, black Americans are three times more likely to be killed than white people. The protests are one way to bring awareness and demand change from police.

Protests over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died last month after being pinned down by a white police officer in Minneapolis, continue on the sixth consecutive day in Washington, DC, on June 3, 2020. (Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Protests over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died last month after being pinned down by a white police officer in Minneapolis, continue on the sixth consecutive day in Washington, DC, on June 3, 2020. (Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

If you can’t join a protest, there are other ways to support the racial justice cause. If it’s within your capabilities, you can make a financial donation to a handful of organizations supporting racial equality. There are also other steps you can take. Here’s what to know.

Where to donate:

There are many nonprofits with missions worthy of your donation. It’s up to you if you want to focus your funds to legacy ones like the NAACP and ACLU that have championed civil rights for nearly 100 years; donate directly to the families of those affected by the latest wave of violence; or financially support the legal fees of 10,000 people who’ve been arrested since last week’s protests broke out.

Cashay checked the nonprofit’s credentials on GuideStar and Charity Navigator. The Obama Foundation also curated a list of resources and many are included below.

Organizations to follow on social media:

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Numbers to call and text:

A demonstrator displays a message of protest on shoes as protesters rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, near the White House in Washington, U.S., June 3, 2020. (REUTERS/Tom Brenner)
A demonstrator displays a message of protest on shoes as protesters rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, near the White House in Washington, U.S., June 3, 2020. (REUTERS/Tom Brenner)
  • Call 612-348-5550 for Hennepin County, Minnesota District Attorney Mike Freeman and Attorney General Keith Ellison will lead the state’s prosecution team against Officers Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and Alexander Kueng to vocalize your support.

  • Call 502-735-1784 for Stand With Bre, a grassroots organization formed to bring justice for the late Ms. Taylor. The number above provides instruction to volunteers on how to effectively and gracefully communicate to state, local and federal officials.

  • Text ‘FLOYD’ to 55-156

  • Text ‘JUSTICE’ to 66-8336

  • Text ‘ENOUGH’ to 55-165

  • Call 502-574-2003 for Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and demand justice for Breonna Taylor.

Petitions to sign:

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Action items:

  • Register to vote. Check to see if your state has an upcoming primary; the general election is Tuesday, Nov. 3.

  • Be an ally. Check in on your black friends, family, neighbors, partners, and colleagues.

  • Support black-owned small businesses.

  • Educate yourself and read up on what it means to be anti-racist. If you're a parent, there are resources and books to read with your child.

  • Screenshot, share, and repost resources to educate those around you.

  • Identify privilege and condemn it.

  • Don’t support organizations that promote division and hate. The Southern Poverty Law Center is a nonprofit that monitors hate groups and extremists in the U.S.

  • Join a peaceful protest in your city, if you’re able.

  • Continue to advocate after the outrage subsides.

Stephanie is a reporter for Yahoo Money and Cashay, a new personal finance website. Follow her on Twitter @SJAsymkos.

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